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Applying 3-Note Chords - Canon In D

Mike Trainor (266) · [archive]
Style: Classical · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 80
Pages: 1 2

The bass is usually not thought of as a chordal instrument; however, there are many useful applications for using bass chords. There is a fairly simple way to memorize at least 2 ways of playing every major and minor chord on the bass. To play any major triad, find the root (or key) note on the top string (this note is not fretted, then fret the A string 2 frets (or a 5th)higher than the root note, the D string on the same fret, and the G string one fret lower. For example, play A string 12th fret, D string 12th fret and G string 11th fret -- this will give you a D chord. By moving the note on the D string down 1 fret and the note on the G string down 2 frets, you now get an A chord (or a chord lowered a 4th). Any chord using this form has its root note on the A string. For minor chords, play the first form of the major chord that we have used, and simply move the note on the G string down 1 fret. D major now becomes D minor. By taking this minor chord and lowering the note on the D string 2 frets and lowering the note on the G string 1 fret we get an A minor chord (or a chord lowered a 4th). We now have enough info to play the basic chord pattern to Pachelbel's Canon in D. The chords are Dmaj, Amaj, Bm, F#m, Gmaj, Dmaj, Gmaj, Amaj. Begin with the D major chord at the 12th fret and work down the fretboard. You will notice the changes in voicings (chord forms) to the D and A chords. I have included the more difficult middle section on this first page. The following page shows the chords as they are arpeggiated.
Applying 3-Note Chords - Canon In D